Category Archives: sewing

More Card Holders!

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card holder 4I couldn’t help but make up a few more of these. So simple, and so much more fun to give and receive than an envelope!

I usedĀ  fabric that I has stacked and slashed to get the multi-layered chenille effect (that in itself is so much fun to do) then followed the process described in the link on my previous post.

I know a little hippie-chick who’s going to love one of these!

 

 

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Gift Card Holder

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card holder 2Another great idea from the small projects download at Quiltingarts.com.
I plan on using these two as gift card holders, but they would work for business cards, driver’s license, anything that size. Each has two pockets, but only one side works “magically” by ejecting the card when the ribbon is pulled.
Of course, you could easily alter the instructions to make both pockets function that way.

They go together really quickly and easily. You really can make up a few in an hour or less.

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I used fabricĀ  scraps from another project, so they were already pieced and embellished for the most part.

I hope the “giftees” like the holder as well as the card!

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Tiny Fabric Gift Box

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Tiny Fabric Gift Box

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I want to give my girls some special jewelry for Christmas and had been looking for pretty ways to wrap it when I came across this download from Quilting Daily.
Tiny gift box

4 boxes

These are very simple, and quite pretty. I did have to enlarge the pattern about 20% in order to have it fill the 8×8 square, so be aware of that.
The instructions say to “sew close to all cut edges, including the slits”. I used a decorative stitch and then thought, “why didn’t I just do buttonholes?”. Make buttonholes. I will next time.
Other than that, follow the instructions. I did, for once and they turned out just great.

I made one out of paper, just by folding up the pattern and it occurred to me that these would look great made out of a heavy stock handmade paper. Something soft enough to bend with out creasing, so don’t use a cardstock. Maybe a Japanese mulberry paper or some such.

Here’s what they look like opened up:

flat

Here is some context for size:

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Can’t wait til my girls get to open their gifts, and then keep the wrapping to store them in!

close up

The Anorak

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At the end of the day, this was salvageable. I am so glad that I started with a size smaller than usual. Had I not, this would have been a donation jacket.

I made trouble for myself by cleverly deciding to make it reversible and then not paying attention to details. Like the front, which had cut-on facings that folded over twice. I only cut them off at the first fold line, but of course, I didn’t figure that our until it was put together and top-stitched. Yes, even that. But I hacked off two inches on each side and carefully turned in the seam allowances and it all worked out ok.

Here it is one side 1…


As it is, I cut off a total of 3 inches from the sleeve hem, and look at the cuffs that are left! Who are these things designed for? Someone with arms as long as her legs. I may sew some small snaps on the sleeves so I can keep the cuffs in place.
The hood is huge, more like you would expect to see on a Little Red Riding Hood cape than a jacket, but I guess it works. Maybe some critter with arms that long has a really big head too. I’m picturing Quasimodo.

I do like the two fabrics together. You may recognize the lighter one from my last garment, the comfy Vogue tunic. Apparently I got a great deal on the fabric and bought about 5 yards. The darker fabric is a quilted knit that has quite a bit of sheen to it, almost like it is water resistant, but I don’t think it is.

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And here is side 2…

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This still feels a little sloppy -big, but it is wearable.

Please forgive the ultra-lousy picture behind my head.
This was the only spot in my hotel room where there was enough light (barely) to take pics and the painting was bolted to the wall.
Do people steal bad art from hotel rooms?

 

 

Anorak McCall’s 5635

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Hoo boy. I decided to make this one reversible. And in knit fabrics. I made it one size smaller since I was working with knits. It is still pretty big. Had to make a few adjustments to the pattern, getting rid of front facing, for example. Didn’t get that quite right on the first try. Must hack off another 2 inches on each side. Guess I didn’t see there were two fold lines.
And the sleeves. Dear god, this must have been sized for some other kind of primate. I cut three inches off the sleeves and still have enough for the very deep cuff. If you opt for the elastic cuff, you’ll have to make the sleeve much narrower or end up with about 4x bulk around the wrist. Crazy.
Pics to follow tomorrow after this shapes up a bit.
Oh, and the hood is huge too, but I kinda like it.

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New Fall Wardrobe

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New Fall Wardrobe

As I took a look through the Fall 2012 RTW shows, I was just loving the patterned, layered sweater knits and all-over patterned pants suits like this one from Rue du Mail.

And so the shopping began, I found a couple black and ivory knits in a wool/cotton blend from Fashion Fabrics Club and a tweedy woven wool at JoAnn, and dug out a few other pieces from my stash. Initially, I was going to make a draped skirt, a top and a jacket, but I ended up going a little crazy and finished with six pieces.

How can I wear thee? Let me count the ways…

First, the skirt. I used McCalls 5434,

but altered the pattern by cutting four slices in the right front from the side seam almost to the center. I spread them apart right on the fabric and trued the line as I cut. Daring; I know, but it worked just fine. You can’t take this stuff too seriously. Then I gathered up that side to its original proportions. I’m pleased with the result. Here it is.

Next came a top to go with. I picked up this Vogue 8771 last week, thinking it would be ever so comfy in sweater knits for this upcoming 6 months that we call Winter in Upstate NY. When JoAnn has Vogue patterns for $3.99, I can’t resist and this time came home with 8 or so.

I used the same knit as for the skirt on the body, and the coordinating knit for the sleeves. I love the high-low hemline here.

I have sewn Butterick 4665 three or four times now.

It’s a very simple coat that goes together quickly and fits me well after a FBA the first time around. I omitted pockets and closures, just wanting this to be more of a casual cardigan type jacket. Again, I mixed the two knits and lined it in a champagne colored charmeuse from my stash.

I had enough of the smaller print to sew up a simple pair of elastic waist pants, also from M5434. I’m feeling like it might be a bit much to wear together, but, hey, that was the goal, right?

Then I remembered that I had made up the top from Vogue 8771 in that same charmeuse I used for the jacket lining. Bonus piece! I don’t like the fit of this at all; there’s just too much of it, it’s all too big and shiny, but it works under jackets with just a bit of the drapey neckline peeking out. Charmeuse and DD’s is just plain stupid. I know better.

Part of my Vogue haul was Vogue 8757, a most adorable little jacket with a collar that goes oh-so-many ways.

I used both knits, for the sleeves and collar, some stash fleece for the side front and under collar and the woven wool for the front and back.

Everything was going so well. The muse was upon me. I hardly had to pick out a seam. Even the serging was smooth. Then I tried on the jacket and there was some funky bunching along the back sleeves. . I thought I caught the lining, or (gods forbid) cut off some critical bits when serging the sleeve into the shoulders, but after a couple ons-and-offs, I determined that the woven wool had far more “give” than the brocade I used to line it with and that was causing the bumps. So I cleverly pulled a bit crosswise on the lining, which promptly shredded down the center back seam. No, no seam allowances; I had serged them off! Clever girl. The best I could do was to bind the edges so it doesn’t fray further and vow to never take the jacket off in public. So much for any smugness I might have been feeling. And, yes, those are skulls on the brocade. It was leftover from a costume something or other I made for my son and I didn’t have another piece of anything suitable to use. Should have just gone shopping. I knew better!

Vogue 1159

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I eventually had to put this on my dress form to get the pieces and parts in the right places. I’d have thought maybe it was just me being a little thick-headed except that when I started to get frustrated I did a quick search to see if I was, in fact, thick-headed, or if there were errors.
Sure ’nuff, I wasn’t the only one out there.
Apart from the mistakes, others noted that they had made alterations when finished; sewn up the side seams to shorten the armholes and tacked the draped front closed. If I were going to wear the dress by itself, I’d have done the same, but in my experience as a full busted individual, wrap front dresses never stay closed well enough and so I opted to leave the dress as is and wear a tank underneath.
Since I used a silky lycra knit… I got it on clearance and suppose it might be a swim wear knit… I didn’t bother to line the skirt. It’s a decision I’m glad of since one of the pattern errors has to do with the lining and I might have bagged the whole project by that point.
All things considered, I am quite pleased with the results. The fit is good, the fabric worked well and it is very comfortable to wear.
Apologies for the lousy photo. Time crunch. Sometimes adequate just has to do.

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